The Clarity of Sweep

Original Source: National Archives and Records Administration

Original Source: National Archives and Records Administration

It’s perfect, each time the large utility broom pushes against my garage floor. The winter dirt and dead leaves and endless dust collect into a small, contained pile at my feet. I see the purpose behind this rather mundane action; to make the space in my garage clear and free of distraction. And with a brief, sharp suction from the vacuum the pile is gone. Clean. Perfect.

A week later I’m sitting in the Rockn’ Joe coffeehouse in Millburn still satisfied with my work. It’s a gorgeous feeling when you know you have done something of value, however small it may be. Cleaning my garage is useful even if only for the initial sense of put-togetherness I find when I walk from my car to the house. It grounds me.

Through trial and observation I’ve come to approach my work in the same way. It should be of value, and it should ground me. Notice I didn’t use the term “career” here. Why? Because I had long been seduced by the trappings of career, to the point where those trappings stopped holding  currency to me. Work is pure, accountable, digestible. You can point to work and readily determine its value, to yourself and to those you serve. You can’t do that so easily with career, at least in the way it plays out for many.

Hence, today’s launch of this blog, DailyWorkLife.  It’s designed to be about the experience of work – what it means, how it feels and what happens when you are unable to live it to its fullest. We’ll look at our reader’s stories, what’s happening in the news, market and global trends and the past. I want this blog, this work, to be alive with learning and commentary. Because the things that are of the greatest value are those that push us forward, even if the movement is a bit uncomfortable.

Let’s get to work.

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  1. […] my prior blog “The Clarity of Sweep” I wrote about pursuing work that feels real, valuable and pure vs. pursuing work primarily for the […]

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